Tea & Health

On Tea & Health: Get Chipper

The research is clear--tea is good for you. You've heard it before, no doubt. We have to be careful though--the FDA gets finicky when we say certain things. We can’t tell you that tea will cure all your ills (or make you a tiger-taming, globe-trotting hero), but we can share the basics and what that means for your health. Onward.

1

Tea has lots (and lots) of Polyphenols

Polyphenols are plant-derived compounds that seem to be quite good for us.

Polyphenols come in several variants, among them are Catechins, Theaflavins, and Tannins. Past and current research has explored the effect of consuming polyphenols from tea on cancer, heart disease, blood pressure, and a range of other issues.

Again, we can’t tell you that tea is a magic elixir that will make you strong enough to take a cannonball to the gut (wink wink), but we can share unbiased research with you without making the claims.

Search #TeaSearch (like tea-research, get it?) on Twitter or our Journal for summaries of high-quality scientific studies on the health benefits of tea.

2

Tea has L-Theanine

L-Theanine is a rare type of amino acid found almost exclusively in tea (sorry, coffee fans). 

In many studies, L-Theanine seems to work synergistically with the caffeine in tea to promote a more focused energy, rather than the often jittery energy that comes from caffeine alone. Perhaps that's why tiger-taming monks choose tea, we'll never know. Feel free to read all about it on good ol' Wikipedia

Search #Teasearch (like tea-research, get it?) on Twitter or our Journal for summaries of high-quality scientific studies on the health benefits of tea. 

3

What about Tisanes (a.k.a Herbal Teas)?

Tisanes carry their own health benefits, which are also well-documented but separate from true tea. 

If you've had a moment to explore the Tea Basics section, you understand that “tea” in the truest sense of the word only applies to the dried leaves of one, single species of plant (Camellia Sinensis). This means that other plants, like mint, rooibos, chamomile, or hibiscus aren't technically “tea”. We call these herbal blends “tisanes” instead.

Even-though chamomile “tea” isn't technically tea, it’s still quite good for you (as are most tisanes). We encourage you to do your own research. Dig around. Search for the health benefits of various tisanes. You’ll find a wealth of information that is much too cumbersome to provide here. Happy searching!